By William Carter

Photographer, Author, Jazz Musician

Posts Tagged ‘photography

Those Teens Part 2

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With the present series of posts. I bring together photographs made from 1958 to 2014 — 56 years — highlighting teenagers from cultures worldwide. Where it is sometimes not obvious if someone is technically a teen, or a bit younger or older, I have opted to be inclusive.

Wide differences of time and place, class and society are obvious in this series. More and more, though, my way of seeing has been to look past the external differences — toward the humanity, the soul that unites.

teens2.1California, c. 2013

teens2.2California, c. 2013

teens2.3California, c. 2013

teens2.4Virginia, c. 2011

teens2.5California, c. 2011

teens2.6California, c. 2011

teens2.7California, c. 2013

teens2.8

California, c. 2012

Copyright statement: William Carter papers, © Stanford University Libraries. Click here for a detailed usage guide.

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Written by bywilliamcarter

September 21, 2018 at 12:00 pm

Those Teens Part 1

with 4 comments


With the present series of posts. I bring together photographs made from 1958 to 2014 — 56 years — highlighting teenagers from cultures worldwide.  Where it is sometimes not obvious if someone is technically a teen, or a bit younger or older, I have opted to be inclusive.

Wide differences of time and place, class and society are obvious in this series. More and more, though, my way of seeing has been to look past the external differences — toward the humanity, the soul that unites.

teens1.1
Germany, c. 2012

teens1.2

California, c. 2012

teens1.3

Lebanon, c. 1965

teens1.4

Lebanon, c. 1965

teens1.5

Indiana, c. 1972

teens1.6

Syria, c. 1964

teens1.7

Lebanon, c. 1965

teens1.8

Iraq, c. 1965

teens1.9

California, c. 2014

Copyright statement: William Carter papers, © Stanford University Libraries. Click here for a detailed usage guide.

Written by bywilliamcarter

September 14, 2018 at 12:00 pm

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More Color from Florida

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From 2014, and also from 2007

The top two, below, are additional pictures taken from the Everglades boardwalks in February, 2014.

Plus, below those two, are five more abstract photographs (numbered 3-7) taken during our only previous visit to Florida’s wild places — in February, 2007, when we got our feet wet trudging through swamplands near the Gulf Coast.

All photographs © William Carter

1---Florida--2-2014-1877---Version-21.

Florida--2-2014-20982.

3---Florida--2-DSC_0037.JPG3.

4---Florida--2-DSC_0034.JPG4.

5---Florida--2-DSC_0053.JPG5.

6---Florida--2-DSC_0069.JPG6.

7---Florida--2-DSC_0070.JPG7.

Copyright statement: William Carter papers, © Stanford University Libraries. Click here for a detailed usage guide.

Written by bywilliamcarter

September 8, 2018 at 12:15 am

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Thanks, Teddy

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Thanks for the Everglades

Having been preoccupied with other projects, I haven’t posted any new blogs for awhile. But here is a new one, signaling resumption of my blog series.

The photographs below are from our visit to the Florida Everglades  in February, 2014. With thanks to Teddy Roosevelt for having established America’s National Parks system, which preserves this and other wilderness treasures.

All photographs © William Carter 2014

1---Florida--2-2014-2049

2---Florida--2-2014-1956

Florida--2-2014-2034---Version-2

4---Florida--2-2014-2022

5---Florida--2-2014-2025---Version-2

6---Florida--2-2014-1905---Version-2

Copyright statement: William Carter papers, © Stanford University Libraries. Click here for a detailed usage guide.

Written by bywilliamcarter

August 24, 2018 at 2:15 pm

The Kit Kat Club

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Google Announces New/Old Name for its Operating System

———————————————by William Carter————————————————————–

Every city has its seamy side. More so, perhaps, ancient Mediterranean ports long accustomed to serving a  variety of visitors — from circulating sailors, to Saudi sheiks, to sun-seekers, to sidewalk speculators.

When Google announced “KitKat” as the name for the latest version of its Android operating system, I thought both of the Nestlé candy bar and of a formerly well-known Beirut strip joint. That bustling city has always attracted a large supply of entertainers — featuring European blondes — to work at every level, from the posh Casino du Liban, on down.

The Kit Kat Club was on the waterfront not far from where I lived from 1964 to 1966. I photographed dancers there, and later in their apartments, as part of a wider magazine story — “Women of Beirut” — a multi-leveled portrait  of this tribal/sophisticated city which I never got around to finishing.

The bottom image. below, shows a larger, seamier section of town which appeared to feature brunettes.

A year later came the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, followed by Lebanon’s long, brutal internal conflicts —  but by then I was gone.

Fast forwarding 47 years, on November 6, 2013 I was heartened to note this passage by Walter Mossberg in the Wall Street Journal: “While the primary goal of KitKat was to run in a much smaller amount of memory, it has a few notable new features. The phone app now places recent and frequent callers first in its favorite call list and de-emphasizes the full list of contacts…”

photographs © William Carter 1966

kitkat01

kitkat02

kitkat03

kitkat04

kitkat05

kitkat06

kitkat07

kitkat08

kitkat09

kitkat10

kitkat11

kitkat12

Copyright statement: William Carter papers, © Stanford University Libraries. Click here for a detailed usage guide.

Written by bywilliamcarter

July 19, 2018 at 1:00 pm

More on Egypt, Mother of the World

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CAN-CARRIER

OILCAN-CARRIER

BOX-CARRIER

BELOW: Checking the View: Supreme Egyptian Military Headquarters, Heliopolis (Cairo):

SENTINEL

BELOW: “Meanwhile, the rich get…”: U.S.-favored former Tunisian ruler Habib Bourguiba, 1965.

Tunisian President, Habib Bourguiba

All of above photographs © William Carter.  Below photographs uncredited, via William Carter courtesy Camera Press (London).

Meanwhile, fundamentalists of every stripe have always liked to impress with “shock and awe”:

Public Execution

Public Execution

Copyright statement: William Carter papers, © Stanford University Libraries. Click here for a detailed usage guide.

Written by bywilliamcarter

June 8, 2018 at 12:00 pm

Egypt, Mother of of the World

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children_uniforms

I landed in Beirut in 1964 knowing nothing of the region. I was there to represent a New York photo agency — when such outfits had their people stationed around the world doing photojournalistic assignments.

One of the first people I met was the New York Times’ Middle East bureau chief, Dana Adams Schmidt. A seasoned writer, he was just leaving for Egypt, Yemen, South Arabia and Yemen: did I want to go with him? I jumped at the chance.

In Cairo I accompanied Dana on some of his political interviews. Nasser was in power trumpeting his anti-colonialist, pro-socialist, Arab-nationalist agenda. Since time immemorial the Egyptians, with their proud history, had considered themselves the cultural and political leaders of the Arab community.

The term for this outlook was — and is — Masr, Um al-Dunia: “Egypt, mother of the world.”

I had time to explore the  teeming, wonderful streets. The following year I would return to the Nile Delta photographing for a UN agricultural development agency. The country’s problems were deep — seemingly intractable — yet the faces were joyous. I can only hope some of that spirit survives the latest crisis. Half a century seems less long inside a seedbed of civilization.

All photos © William Carter 1965
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street_children_stripes

street_carts

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friends_laughing

Copyright statement: William Carter papers, © Stanford University Libraries. Click here for a detailed usage guide.

Written by bywilliamcarter

May 25, 2018 at 12:00 pm

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